Moodletter provides help for being happier, more capable and confident, even if you are living with depression, bipolar disorder or anxiety.

Where to find mental health help

If you need a therapist, psychiatrist, hospital or other mental health service, you can find help whether or not you have health insurance.

Your family doctor, nurse, social worker or religious leader can help and also offer referrals to other services. Local universities may offer private and/or sliding-scale fee clinic treatment options through their departments of psychiatry or psychology.

Look for services in the yellow pages under “mental health,” “health,” “social services,” “suicide prevention,” “crisis intervention services,” “hotlines,” “hospitals,” or “physicians” for phone numbers and addresses. In times of crisis, the emergency room doctor at a hospital will be able to tell you where and how to get further help.

Your employer may offer an employee assistance program (EAP) which can provide counseling and referral for mental health.

If you have health insurance, your plan typically provides a roster of health care providers. Verify before making an appointment to confirm that they are still taking your insurance plan – the lists aren’t always up to date.

Organizations that can offer help include:

  • community mental health centers
  • hospital psychiatry departments and outpatient clinics
  • state hospital outpatient clinics
  • social service agencies
  • local medical and/or psychiatric societies.

Here are some additional resources for getting information and assistance:

Find community mental health centers: The Federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) provides a list of community mental health centers and hospitals that provide psychiatric services in your state.

Locate affordable health care in your area: The Federal Bureau of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) provides a Health Center Database for a nationwide directory of clinics to obtain low or no-cost healthcare.

Find NIMH Clinical Trials: Participants in clinical trials can gain access to new research treatments and help others by contributing to medical research. Find specific studies that are currently recruiting participants

Find a support group: Mental health associations and centers may sponsor groups in your area.

Referral Sources

  • American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy
  • American Association of Pastoral Counselors
  • American Psychiatric Association
  • American Psychological Association
  • Anxiety Disorders Association of America
  • National Association of Social Workers
  • Mental Health America
  • US Department of Veterans Affairs

If you are in a crisis and need immediate help
If you are thinking about harming yourself or attempting suicide, tell someone who can help right away:

  • Call your doctor’s office.
  • Call 911 for emergency services.
  • Go to the nearest hospital emergency room.
  • Call the toll-free, 24-hour hotline of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255) to be connected to a trained counselor at a suicide crisis center nearest you.

Ask a family member or friend to help you make these calls or take you to the hospital.

Related posts: